Duxbury children’s death sparks discussion on mental health treatment

Doctors in Massachusetts are reminding those facing mental health struggles that they don’t need to rush to seek treatment following the deaths of two children in Duxbury. Plymouth County District Attorney Tim Cruz said first responders found three children unconscious and suffering severe trauma inside their Summer Street home Tuesday night. Two of those children, 5-year-old Cora Clancy and 3-year-old Dawson Clancy, were pronounced dead at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Plymouth. The third child, a 7-month-old boy, continues to be treated at a Boston hospital. According to Cruz, it appears the children were strangled, but the state chief medical examiner’s office is working to determine the cause and manner. In the death of Cora and Dawson Clancy. Cruz said authorities are seeking to charge the children’s mother, Lindsey Clancy, with two counts of murder in connection with their deaths. Lindsey Clancy, 32, is being treated at a hospital in Boston after he attempted to do just that. committed suicide, which prompted her husband to make a 911 call to Duxbury police, according to the district attorney. What’s even more shocking to some is that Lindsey Clancy worked as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital, making sense that coping resources may be close but feel out of reach. We do. “It’s something that should be an open discussion from the get-go. You shouldn’t wait until you get to the point: ‘I can’t get out of bed,'” said Chelsea resident Melissa Hulbert, a Mother of 7 week old baby. Hulbert is a 38-year-old first-time mom who has been diagnosed with anxiety and depression. She said she sought mental health help before giving birth to her child. Hulbert said, “It’s nothing to be ashamed of.” Dr. Bobby Wegner, clinical psychologist and Harvard lecturer, who founded the group connection platform Groops. “You feel a burden and want to absorb it, because you are responsible and that definitely adds to the loneliness,” Hulbert said. Wegner said some red flags include feelings of loneliness, difficulty sleeping and a hard time concentrating. “I mean, there were definitely dark thoughts: ‘Why? Why do this?’ It’s very real. So the voices that one can hear, or that one can see, it’s like what you and I see in reality,” Wegner said. “There is usually an underlying mental health condition, and then there may be changes in consciousness that occur to the person who is having a psychotic break.” Wegner said mental health treatment doesn’t have to involve medication, and the most important thing is to talk to someone. Anyone who is having trouble and needs someone to talk to can call the Nationwide Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988. This lifeline provides free and confidential emotional support 24 hours per day.

Doctors in Massachusetts are reminding those facing mental health struggles that they don’t need to be in crisis to seek treatment following the deaths of two children in Duxbury.

Plymouth County District Attorney Tim Cruz said first responders found three children unconscious and suffering from severe trauma inside their Summer Street home Tuesday night. Two of those children, 5-year-old Cora Clancy and 3-year-old Dawson Clancy, were pronounced dead at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Plymouth. The third child, a 7-month-old boy, continues to be treated at a Boston hospital.

According to Cruz, it appears the children were strangled, but the state chief medical examiner’s office is working to determine the cause and manner of Cora and Dawson Clancy’s deaths.

Cruz said authorities are seeking to charge the children’s mother, Lindsey Clancy, with two counts of murder in connection with their deaths.

According to the district attorney, Lindsay Clancy, 32, is being treated at a Boston hospital after she attempted suicide, which prompted her husband to call 911 to Duxbury police.

What makes the situation even more surprising to some is that Lindsey Clancy worked as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital, making sense that coping resources may be close but out of reach. can feel outside.

“It’s something that should be an open discussion from the beginning. You shouldn’t wait until you get to the point: ‘I can’t get out of bed,'” said Chelsea resident Melissa Hulbert, a Baby’s mother 7 weeks old baby.

Hulbert is a 38-year-old first-time mom who has been diagnosed with anxiety and depression. She said she sought mental health help before giving birth to her child.

“It’s nothing to be ashamed of,” Hulbert said.

“A lot of people think they’re going crazy if they really have major mental health problems,” says clinical psychologist and Harvard lecturer Dr. Bobby Wegner, who founded the group connection platform Groups.

“You feel a burden and want to absorb it, because you are responsible and that definitely adds to the loneliness,” Hulbert said.

Wegner said some red flags include feelings of loneliness, difficulty sleeping and difficulty concentrating.

“I mean, of course the dark thoughts were: ‘Why? Why do this?'” Hulbert said.

Wegner said, “The reality of a psychosis is very real to the person experiencing it. So voices that one can hear, or that one can see, are just as you and I see reality.” “There is usually an underlying mental health condition, and then there may be changes in consciousness that occur to the person who is having a psychotic break.”

Wegner said mental health treatment doesn’t have to involve medication, and the most important thing is someone to talk to.

Anyone who is having trouble and needs someone to talk to can call the Nationwide Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988. This lifeline provides free and confidential emotional support 24 hours a day.

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